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Http://www.ees.nmt.edu/geol/classes/camp/info/inf.html

SUMMER GEOLOGY FIELD CAMP 2008
ERTH 480 (6 cr.) and ERTH 483/483/485 (2 cr. each) PREPARATIONS FOR FIELD CAMP
The comments below pertain primarily to the first 4 weeks of geology field camp (ERTH 483 and 484). Packing and Luggage - Consult the field equipment list at:
http://www.ees.nmt.edu/Geol/classes/camp/equip.html to see what is required and generally
acceptable. Luggage space during field camp is limited. Do not bring ice chests, table top
stereo systems, television sets, desk top computers, bicycles and the like. Normally you will be
limited to the equivalent of two large bags plus a field (back) pack during travel. My definition of
a "large bag" is one that is light enough to be carried by one person across a large parking lot
and up three flights of stairs with no more than one rest stop along the way. Duffle bags are
great. If an item is not on the list and you have questions regarding what is acceptable - ask.
Balance of Fees - Off campus participants and Tech students who have not paid the balance
of their tuition and other fees must do so prior to the beginning of field camp. Administrative
offices close at 4:00 p.m. on May 23rd. Because transportation from the airport to Socorro will
arrive too late to pay fees on Friday, off campus students must pay fees by mail or over the
telephone BEFORE May 23rd.
Insurance - All participants in field camp are required to have health insurance in effect
between May 23rd and July 6th. If you have your own health insurance, you must either bring
with you or send to the registrar, proof of coverage for the interval or an official letter
substantiating your coverage. Proof of insurance should also be available during field camp so
that medical providers will have a valid billing company and address.
ACCOMMODATIONS IN SOCORRO
Housing - Students will be responsible for their own lodging through the night of May 23rd. For
those of you coming from out of town, you may stay either in a dorm room at Tech or in a
motel for the nights of May 22nd and May 23rd. You may reserve a double or single occupancy
dorm room (no linen). Last year the prices were $14.50 and $17.50 per night (respectively).
Arrangements may be made through May 12th, by calling Housing (at 505-835-5900). Identify
yourself as part of the "Geology Field Camp Group." Dorm rooms must be reserved and
paid for in advance
. There are many motels in Socorro and you shouldn't have any difficulties
finding a room if you do not make arrangements in advance.
Meals in Socorro - Students will be responsible for their own food through the noon meal on
May 25th.
http://www.ees.nmt.edu/Geol/classes/camp/info/INF.html Private Vehicles - Personal vehicles are not permitted along on the field course.
Parking for Private Vehicles - If you wish to leave your vehicle in Socorro you may do so at
your risk. If you will need to park a vehicle during field camp, contact djohnson@nmt.edu
immediately. Arrangements must be made in advance. Vehicles will be parked on Sunday
morning (May 25th).
SCHEDULE IN SOCORRO (May 23rd - May 25th)
Fri., May 23rd
~7:30 p.m. - Airport pickup and transport to Socorro Sat., May 24th
8:30 - ~11:30 a.m.: Orientation in MSEC 101 13:00 - Intro to Field Methods in the field Sun., May 25th
8:00 a.m. - Load vehicles and travel to Las Vegas, NM noon - lunch in L.V. 13:00 - Intro to Stratigraphy CONDUCT OF FIELD CAMP
Meals - Most meals between the evening May 25th and the morning of July 6th are covered as part of field camp expenses. The exceptions are travel days (approx. 6) when you are expected to provide your own meals from restaurants or in camp. Breakfast, lunch and dinner will be covered by fees during our stay at New Mexico Highlands
University (NMHU; beginning 5/25) and in Taos areas (beginning 6/26). You should bring
sufficient additional funds to cover your food and other purchases for days not covered by the
conditions outlined above. The amount will depend on whether you prepare your own food or
eat at cafes (during the travel days it may be necessary to eat dinners in cafes). We
recommend an absolute minimum of $150.00-$200.00 to cover these meals. You should
bring additional money for incidental expenditures over the 6 weeks.
Dorm Accommodations - Dorm rooms employed for field camp are double occupancy and
come without linen or blankets. Most participants use their sleeping bags. If you require linen,
blankets and pillows, bring some. A small desk lamp may prove to be very useful.
Telephones - The dorm rooms at NMSU are wired for telephones. Numbers to rooms will be
available.
Internet Access - The dorm rooms at NMSU are wired for internet. Please bring an ethernet
cable to connect. Internet access will not be available after departure from NMHU.
http://www.ees.nmt.edu/Geol/classes/camp/info/INF.html Basic Rules and Regulations - A more comprehensive list of rules will be circulated on the
morning of May 24th. Rules below are intended to assist your preparations for field camp and
our departure on May 25th.
A. Firearms and fireworks are not permitted either in the field or in our lodgings. B. Pets will not be permitted during the field course. C. Alcoholic beverages will not be permitted in the field. D. Use of personal vehicles is not permitted. Teaching staff
Three faculty members, plus a teaching assistant will be involved in the course at various times this summer. z Dr. Bruce Harrison (environmental geology, soils geomorphology) z Dr. David Johnson (stratigraphy, carbonate rocks, paleontology) z Dr. Gary Axen (structural geology, igneous and metamorphic petrology) Locale - The first 3? weeks of New Mexico Tech's field geology course will be spent in the
area of Las Vegas, NM in the northeastern part of the state. Students will complete field
exercises in Paleozoic and Mesozoic strata exposed in the area. During this time we will stay
in dormitories at New Mexico Highlands University Las Vegas, New Mexico.
We will spend 6 days on a tour of localities in the Four Corners region affording field camp participants an opportunity to visit geologic and scenic features on the Colorado Plateau. The reminder of the camp will be spent mapping and describing granitoids, metamorphic rocks and ductile deformation in the vicinities of Pilar and Taos in northern New Mexico. OBTAINING YOUR GRADES AFTER FIELD CAMP
Instructors will assign course grades immediately after field camp ends and the final exercise has been graded. You will receive an "unofficial" grade along with the final exercise, if you provide us with a summer mailing address. An official transcript with your grade for Tech's field camp will be provided after August 8, 2007, from the New Mexico Tech Registrar. The first copy will be sent free of charge. Each subsequent copy will cost $5.25 each. The registrar requires a signed transcript request form to release the transcript(s). http://www.ees.nmt.edu/Geol/classes/camp/info/INF.html NEW MEXICO TECH
SUMMER FIELD GEOLOGY
COURSE 2008
Equipment
last updated on: April 22, 2008
Equipment: what you need and where to get it.
Equipment for Field Camp need not be expensive, but it can be. You can spend over $50 on a fancy hydration pack or use a recycled plastic soft drink bottle. Both work equally well. A Gore-Tex rain jacket might start at $150, but I prefer my nylon poncho. The choices (and the $$$) are yours. Below are pointers to several sources for field equipment. Use these if you need to, but feel free to purchase your equipment where you get the best deal - locally if it is from someone you trust. Where should you not skimp? Boots: I recommend that you do not purchase boots at Walmart or similar discount stores. Rather use a store that specializes in hiking and hiking boots. Put them on in the store and spend some time walking around in them. Make certain that boots are comfortable and well fitting. And they should be rugged enough for the summer. Many of the modern 'high tech' boots need little in the way of breaking in. None-the-less, be sure to wear your boots for several days before you come to field camp. Socks (and blisters): Every year we have a few students who suffer from blisters. Proper fitting boots play a big role in avoiding blisters. One aid is wearing two pairs of socks - one pair that is shear and the other a heavy weight boot sock. I use very thin nylon dress socks that I wouldn't be caught dead in otherwise. If you have money to burn, silk or polypro liner socks are available. The idea is that slip will occur between the socks, not between your foot and the sock. If you know that you are prone to blisters, you may wish to bring moleskin and a blister kit. Infections, boots and socks: Hot sweaty feet in the same boots day after day are an open invitation to bacterial and fungal infections. If you have two pair of boots, I recommend that you alternate between them each day. I understand that this is expensive and not realistic for most students. A cheaper insurance policy is to never put on dirty socks for a second day. Always wear clean socks.  Assume that you will contract athlete's foot sometime during field camp and bring along your favorite medication to treat it.   Poison Oak: While we are on the subject of health issues, I might point out that poison oak (or ivy if you are more familiar with that term) occurs in areas where we will be working in Northern New Mexico. Many of us are quite susceptible to this plant. Obviously the best remedy is to know what it looks like and to avoid exposure. If that fails, there are now some http://www.ees.nmt.edu/Geol/classes/camp/stuff.html fairly effective remedies. We've used Tecnu cleanser and have had pretty good success. z Outdoor outfitters: raingear, packs, hydration systems, boots . { REI Outlet - discounted outdoor clothing and equipment (overstocks and closeouts) { Sierra Trading Post - discount outfitter (overstocks and closeouts) z Geology Equipment: field notebooks, rock hammers, hand lenses . Dr. David B. Johnson Department of Earth and Environmental Science New Mexico Institute of Mining & Technology Socorro, New Mexico 8780l Phone - (505) 835-5634 FAX - (505) 835-6436 e-mail - djohnson@nmt.edu ERTH 480 homepage
http://www.ees.nmt.edu/Geol/classes/camp/stuff.html A) Essential Items (required for all registrants) water bottle(s) or hydration pack (4 qts. minimum) HCl & container pencils - 0.3 or 0.5 mm mechanical with HB lead tracing paper (8?x11") and an equal-area stereo erasable colored pencils (10 colors min.) cross-section vellum/paper - 10 squares/inch (11" transparent protractor & spare protractor "walkman"-type personal stereo with headphones 1 Boots - Boots should be rugged, broken in, but new. A used pair of boots or cheap boots will not survive the entire six weeks. Bring an extra pair if there is any question. 2 Cooking - We will camp as part of several travel days. Typically morning and evening meals are prepared in camp. A two burner stove and some larger pots and pans will be available. Plan on bringing your own eating utensils (cup, bowl, spoon). 3 First aid Kit - Should include bandaids, needle, tweezers, disinfectant, aspirin, moleskin, antacid, diarrhea treatment, sunburn ointment, insect bite ointment, prescription medicines and (if you are sensitive to poison oak) Techno http://www.ees.nmt.edu/Geol/classes/camp/equip.html products. 4 Geology in the Field by Robert R. Compton, 1985, ISBN # 0-471-82902-1. 5 Money - You should bring funds to cover expenses related to your travel to and from Socorro, and for meals on the 5 travel days (an additional ~$200). Depending on your style of living, you should have additional funds to cover such things as laundry, film, and miscellaneous expenses. 6 Paper - This is the paper that will be used variously for written reports accompanying field maps, strat columns, cross sections, and other figures. Blank or ruled paper is acceptable, but some type of grid paper (engineering pads work, but are in inches) might be better. 7 Pens - Final projects are to be in ink. Ball-point pens are unacceptable. We recommend throw-away technical drafting pens that are graduated in size and use archival quality (nonfading, waterproof, nonacid) ink. Examples are the (pigma) MICRON brand, manufactured by Sakura Color Products Corp or the Zig Memory System Millenium pens by Kuretake Co. We recommend a 005 (0.2 mm line width) or 01 (~0.25 mm) in black for contacts, attitudes and lettering, plus an 02 (0.30 mm) in red, green or orange for faults. If you only buy black, the two sizes need to be separated by at least one intervening size so the line widths are clearly distinguishable. Probably two of the black pens is best as they do not stand up to heavy-handed writers: the nibs deform and the lines get fat. 8 Sleeping bag - You should have a sleeping bag along for the 7 nights when we will be camping. Although it would be unusual, temperatures approaching freezing are possible. Dorm rooms come without linen and many students use their bags on beds in the dorms. 9 Tent - During travel, weather can be unpredictable and on nights when it is either cold or wet, it is nice to have access to a tent. Not everyone needs to bring a tent. If you would like to know if there is someone who is willing to share a tent contact Dave Johnson who will query other students. 10 Two 1-ft2 Plexiglas pieces with a fiber- or duct-tape hinge. Sturdy rubber bands hold down the map without tape. Anything to protect your map and give you a stiff working surface will do. You need a way to keep your map from flapping/tearing in the wind. Cut strong rubber bands radially from old car tire inner tubes. http://www.ees.nmt.edu/Geol/classes/camp/equip.html last updated on: April 16, 2008
z How physically demanding is this going to be? 
z What will the weather be like?
z What dangers might I face?
z How much stuff should I bring?
z What sort of camping will we be doing?
z How should I arrange my flight into Albuquerque and departure from Albuquerque?
z What kind of field notebooks do we need?
z Do we need a ruler with English units or an engineering scale . ?
z Do we need HCl and a container or just the container?
The following information is relevant to your participation in field camp this summer. How physically demanding is this going to be? - Geologic field work frequently involves strenuous
activity. These activities may occur at elevations higher than customary and in weather conditions that are
less than ideal. While you do not need to be a marathon runner, you must be able to hike off trail.  We
recommend that in the time remaining you increase your level of physical activity in preparation for
field camp
. Vigorous walking, hiking, jogging or biking will pay dividends. Learn to drink fluids regularly
while exercising. This will be crucial during field camp.
What will the weather be like? - We will be in northern New Mexico operating at elevations above 6,500
feet. Anything you might imagine (and then some) is possible for weather conditions. We have been snowed
on for Memorial Day (daily max. temp. < 40 degrees F) and a few days later experienced 100 degrees F. We
have had years when it rained virtually every day (bring rain gear!) and others when the countryside was so
dry that forest fires were a threat (bring sunscreen). The bottom line is prepare for the worst - extremes of
heat/cold and wet/dry.
What dangers might I face?  
z Dehydration: Except when it is raining cats and dogs, New Mexico has very low humidity. This is
good in one sense, because evaporation of perspiration will cool you on hot days. The negative side
is that one can quickly become dehydrated
. Plan on having plenty of water with you (minimum 2
quarts) and drinking regularly - before you are thirsty.
z Creepy crawlies and bigger stuff: Folks who are not from New Mexico are concerned about
spiders, snakes and other threats from animals (and plants).  Yes, tarantulas, scorpions, rattlesnakes, bears, wildcats and other forms of wild life inhabit New Mexico.  So far as I am aware, not one single field camp participant has been lost to any of these dangers.  Some time at our orientation will be spent providing you with information about how to avoid encounters with wildlife.  The bottom line: understand the dangers, use common sense and things will be fine. http://www.ees.nmt.edu/Geol/classes/camp/info/faq.html z Other injuries: Working in topographically rugged areas requires attention and judgment.  Be
careful in steep terrain and if you feel uncomfortable about following a particular route - don't.
How much stuff should I bring? - The list provided is intended to guide you in the acquisition of
equipment for the field camp. Notice that the list is subdivided into equipment that is essential (required),
desirable (recommended), and optionalDo not bring ice chests, table top stereo systems or television
sets, bicycles, desktop or tower computers (laptops and PDAs are allowed), and the like. Luggage space
during field camp is limited. Normally you will be limited to two luggage bags and your backpack during
travel.
What sort of camping will we be doing? - Most of the time we will be staying in dorms. We will camp in
various locations for seven nights. This will be car camping.  You should have a sleeping bag that is
comfortable down to the mid 40's (F), a sleeping pad/mattress, and access to a tent.  Shared tents are fine.
How should I arrange my flight into Albuquerque and departure from Albuquerque? - If you are
planning to fly to Albuquerque the following information will be useful in planning your flights. I will plan
to send a department van to the Albuquerque airport to pick up students arriving there. That van will depart
Albuquerque for Socorro in the late afternoon or early evening of Friday, May 23, 2008. I can set the time
more firmly as I have information on arrival times for all students. In making your travel plans assume that
the van will leave Albuquerque for Socorro no later than 8:00 pm on Friday, May 23, 2008. At the
completion of the course, we can drop you off at the Albuquerque airport by 2:00 p.m. on Sunday, July 6th.
Return flights from Albuquerque may be arranged for the afternoon or evening of Sunday, July 6th. If you
return to Socorro, you will need to make arrangements to return to Albuquerque or other points.
What kind of field notebooks do we need? Regular school notebooks or Rite in the Rain notebooks
from Forestry supplies? Spiral, bound, ring binder? -
Notebooks should be bound (not ring binders or
spiral binders. I don't care much for rite in the rain field books (and they are expensive), but prefer bound
transit books like the Sokkia Field Books at http://www.ascscientific.com/fldbks.html.
Do we need a ruler with English units or an engineering scale where the inches are divided into
even numbers of units?
- Not engineering scale. Again, I prefer metric and English in 10ths of inches.
Do we need HCl and a container or just the container?  And, if both, where can I get the HCl? I
know I can order the container online?
- You need the container. I don't like to travel with acid in a
plastic bottle and I suspect you won't either and who knows what the TSA will say. We'll have acid on that
first Saturday.
http://www.ees.nmt.edu/Geol/classes/camp/info/faq.html If you have any questions, regarding any aspects of the field camp, equipment, etc., do not hesitate to giveme a call (number below), or drop me a line. http://www.ees.nmt.edu/Geol/classes/camp/info/faq.html Basic Rules and Regulations - A more comprehensive list of rules will be circulated on the
morning of May 24th. Rules below are intended to assist your preparations for field camp and
our departure on May 25th.
A. Firearms and fireworks are not permitted either in the field or in our lodgings. B. Pets will not be permitted during the field course. C. Alcoholic beverages will not be permitted in the field. D. Use of personal vehicles is not permitted. Teaching staff
Three faculty members, plus a teaching assistant will be involved in the course at various times this summer. z Dr. Bruce Harrison (environmental geology, soils geomorphology) z Dr. David Johnson (stratigraphy, carbonate rocks, paleontology) z Dr. Gary Axen (structural geology, igneous and metamorphic petrology) Locale - The first 3? weeks of New Mexico Tech's field geology course will be spent in the
area of Las Vegas, NM in the northeastern part of the state. Students will complete field
exercises in Paleozoic and Mesozoic strata exposed in the area. During this time we will stay
in dormitories at New Mexico Highlands University Las Vegas, New Mexico.
We will spend 6 days on a tour of localities in the Four Corners region affording field camp participants an opportunity to visit geologic and scenic features on the Colorado Plateau. The reminder of the camp will be spent mapping and describing granitoids, metamorphic rocks and ductile deformation in the vicinities of Pilar and Taos in northern New Mexico. OBTAINING YOUR GRADES AFTER FIELD CAMP
Instructors will assign course grades immediately after field camp ends and the final exercise has been graded. You will receive an "unofficial" grade along with the final exercise, if you provide us with a summer mailing address. An official transcript with your grade for Tech's field camp will be provided after August 8, 2007, from the New Mexico Tech Registrar. The first copy will be sent free of charge. Each subsequent copy will cost $5.25 each. The registrar requires a signed transcript request form to release the transcript(s). http://www.ees.nmt.edu/Geol/classes/camp/info/INF.html FIELD ADDRESSES and PHONE NUMBERS (Tentative) FIELD ADDRESSES and EMERGENCY PHONE NUMBERS The addresses and emergency numbers for our major layovers are listed below. The
emergency numbers will connect the caller with someone who may communicate emergency
messages
only. Regular calls may be made and taken from pay phones where available,
however, those numbers will not be known until arrival. If we are unavailable at the emergency
numbers below, contact the Department of Earth and Environmental Science at New Mexico
Tech by phone at (505) 835-5635.
May 20 - June 13, 2007: Las Vegas, NM (UPS and FedEx packages are typically not delivered at NMHU) your name New Mexico Tech Field Camp c/o General Delivery New Mexico Highlands University Las Vegas, NM 87701 Emergency Number: (505) 454-3274 (Campus security) June 14 - June 20, 2007: Camping in Four Corners region your name New Mexico Tech Field Camp c/o Taos Mountain Lodging Center P.O. Box 2626, Taos, NM 87571 Guest Phone Number: 505-776-8940 http://www.ees.nmt.edu/Geol/classes/camp/info/add.htm Saturday
Thursday
Tentative 2008 ERTH 480 Field Exercise Schedule

Source: http://www.ees.nmt.edu/outside/courses/camp/info/Master.pdf

Camper health history form-2.2014-final

Camper Health To Parent(s)/Guardian(s): Complete this section and give this form (FORM 2) and a copy of your completed CAMPER HEALTH HISTORY FORM (Form 1) to your child’s health-care provider for review. History Form 2 Dates will attend camp: From ______________________________ to ____________________________ Camper Name ___________________________________________________

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