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Review 2006-1 beip review report _2005_-final



Contents

1. Background . 3 2. Terms of Reference for the Review . 4 3. Methodology . 5 4. Outcome of the Review. 5 4.1 General impression. 5 4.2 International Donors and Agencies . 6 4.3 Local Stakeholders . 10 4.4 Earthquake Impact. 12 5.1 SWAp . 15 5.2 Gender . 16 5.3 Operationalisation of LCOs . 17 5.4 School Monitoring System. 18 5.5 Assessment of the training programmes . 19 5.6 Stakeholders’ Coordination. 19 5.7 Lack of Communication within the District Government. 20 5.8 Political interference . 20 5.9 Weak Institutional Capacity . 21 DRAFT Terms of Reference . 22 Itinerary for the Review of BEIP in NWFP, Pakistan. 27 1. Background
In December 2003, the Norwegian Government signed an Agreement with the
Government of Pakistan to support the Basic Education Improvement Project (BEIP)
with a grant amounting to NOK 72,6 million. There is no commitment on additional
funding above the NOK 72,6 mill. from Norway.
The BEIP was then defined as a “gap filling project” to the Institutional Reforms
Programme” (IRP) funded by the World Bank. The IRP targeted the full social sector,
though around 60% of the funds have been used for the education sector. During the
preparation period for the BEIP support, the objective of expanding/having the
flexibility to integrate the support into a (primary) education (sub-) sector programme
was clearly expressed in the Embassy's Work Plan for 2004 and 2005. The signed
Agreement for BEIP therefore has the flexibility to facilitate such a change.
The overall goal of the BEIP project is to “contribute to Quality Education for All”.
The initial agreement stated six objectives for the project:
1) 27 007 Schools Managers (from primary to higher secondary school level) trained
in administrative, supervisory and financial matters.
2) Establishment of 300 Local Circle Office/Local Teachers Resources Centres.
3) 4 484 Primary School Teachers to be trained as Mentor Support Teachers
4) Improve teacher guides (maths and languages) provided for Kachi (KG), Grade 1
and Grade 2 for 22 573 Primary schools
5) More effective community involvement in school management and support
through
reformed Parent Teacher Association (PTAs)
6) Initiation of the process of mainstreaming Madrasas Education
During the first year of operation, four activities have been added to the project:
• Strengthening of the existing teacher training institutions i.e. RITEs, PITE, • Advertisement and awareness campaign through print and electronic media These last four activities were also mentioned in the PC-1, but not listed specifically as objectives. After commissioning a joint assessment (with DFID) in September 2003, to explore possibilities for establishing a Sector Wide Approach Programme (SWAp) in the education sector and support to the same, individual donors (particularly DFID) have taken initiatives to spearhead such a programme . However, these attempts have, for different reasons, not materialised or failed. Since then two major efforts towards developing a sector programme in the NWFP have been made: On the one hand, at the time of the review the European Commission (EC) had deployed an international consultant in the Schools & Literacy Department in NWFP. The objective is to assess the possibilities of establishing a SWAp for NWFP and FATA, and review the modalities for the same. The EC has established an overall timeframe for their plans and work towards a SWAp, leading to a signed agreement at end of 2006. Other donors will be welcomed to join into this programme. On the other hand, in September 2005, the Govt. of NWFP constituted a 5 member committee to work towards the same objective; establishing an education SWAp in the NWFP. Other donors; like the World Bank and the USAID may also be interested to be in the forefront of such a development, as well as other donors that may want to join in. Norway should therefore assess the status of existing alternatives with the aim to link up to a suitable mechanism appropriate for Norway’s development strategy if and when such mechanisms are developed. NWFP is one of the provinces that experienced the devastating impact of the earthquake that hit Pakistan October 8, 2005. Undoubtedly, this is the worst natural calamity in Pakistan’s history. The colossal loss of life and property caused by the earthquake makes the relief, reconstruction and rehabilitation efforts a mammoth task. Not only will it take a lot of resources, both human and financial, but also rebuilding the earthquake hit areas would demand a long period of time of sustained and coordinated efforts from local, national and international relief agencies and development partners. 2. Terms of Reference for the Review
These are found in their full form as an annexure. In summary they require the
consultants to provide updated information to facilitate the Embassy’s follow up and
monitoring of the BEIP project. The TORs are clear in specifiying that the review
will focus upon issues relevant for the general implementation of the project, but with
some inputs towards assessing the status of the SWAp initiatives. In particular, the
review team was asked, among other things, to:
• assess aspects of capacity within the NWFP education department relevant for planning, implementation and monitoring, especially the capacity on lower levels; i.e. district, thesil and union councils • address areas of weakness/limited capacity where interventions, e.g. reorganisation or other efforts in for instance the form of Technical Assistance that might strengthen the programme. • assess the present plans and strategies within the Schools & Literacy Department in Peshawar for future development of the education sector in NWFP, especially with relevance to linkages or integration of BEIP into an education SWAp • address the status of the EU initiative towards establishing an education SWAp in the province and also explore possible linkage by BEIP (and other donors) to this programme. 3. Methodology
The review was conducted in a conventional way through the study of a number of
relevant documents, site visits and interviews with significant informants within the
Schools & Literacy Department in NWFP, as well as donor community in Pakistan.
Key education policies and strategies of the federal, provincial and district
governments constitutes the documentary analysis, in addition to relevant and current
policies and strategies of development partners and donor agencies involved in (or
planning to be involved in) the education sector in NWFP. Interviews were conducted
with the following categories of informants: Key bilateral donors - DfID, Netherland
and GTZ; multilateral agencies – the World Bank and EU and civic organisations
NCHD and DTCE and the government officials at School and Literacy Department at
both the provincial and district level.
Field visits were particularly significant, especially for the opportunity they provided
to see the schools, meet with the pupils, teachers and parents/community leaders, as
well as inspect and assess the progress of the construction of the Local Circle Offices
(LCOs). In total, five districts, namely Kohat, Hangu, Mardan, Swabi and Abbottabad
were visited and the review team had the opportunity to interview and discuss with
District education department staff - EDO (S&L), DOs and ADOs both female and
male. In each districts the team also inspected the construction of the 2 Local Circle
Offices (for female and male) and visited schools attached to the LCOs and talked to
the teachers and students/pupils. In Abbottabad, an earthquake hit district, the team
visited two schools (female and male) which had been destroyed beyond use by the
earthquake. The team also visited a Tentage Village for Earthquake Affectees –
Banda Said Khan Havelian, where the team found that two tent schools, also referred
to as ‘education space’ had been established. One is a private school called Lok
Sudhaar Primary School (UNICEF Supported), while the other is Govt. Middle
School, Tentage Village, B. S. Khan, Abbottabad
4. Outcome of the Review
4.1 General impression
The general impression regarding the implementation of BEIP project is a positive
one. With reference to the 2004 review, it is obvious that most of the project
activities have been steadily accomplished with a considerable degree of success. This
is perhaps more clearly demonstrated in the project’s training programmes and the
construction of the 300 LCOs activities.
Training programmes for head teachers and teachers, through technical assistance
from GTZ have been conducted and the fist round of training whereby all head
teachers and head mistresses in the province have received management and
administration training has been completed. In fact, responding to the question on
whether they had received training form the BEIP project, in all the districts visited
the team was informed that training had been delivered. Specifically, it was
mentioned that primary school head teachers, headmasters/mistresses of middle
schools and principals of high and higher secondary school had received training
delivered by the TA from GTZ. Construction of 300 Local Circle Offices (LCOs) –
the main component of the BEIP, accounting to about 34.3% of the project’s budget,
is in good progress.
100 LOCs are finished or near completion. While 100 LCOs are to be completed in two months time, the remaining 100 LOCs are planned to be constructed and finished in FY 2005/06, that is by June 2006. Should this deadline be met, this activity (the construction of LCOs) will be completed exactly one year ahead the scheduled time. Accompanying the construction is the process of procurement of furniture and facilities for the LCOs. Although delayed due to bureaucracy, all formalities have been finalised and authorisation for the procurement of facilities and equipment for the finished LCOs has been issued by the government. This may be considered as a necessary step towards making LCOs functional and operational. Another activity described in the project agreement is “Initiation of the process of mainstreaming Madrasas Education”. Towards this end, it was noted with a great deal of enthusiasm that the Government of Pakistan has issued a government policy to mainstream all madrasas in the country. At the time of the review the process of registering madrasas was going on in the country. In NWFP, the provincial government formed a committee to review madrasas and follow-up their mainstreaming. It was reported that sixty madrasas in NWFP had not only registered, but also willingly wished to be mainstreamed. It was also said that this wish is supported by the Minister for Religious Affairs, who encouraged the School and Literacy Department to speed up the process of education and curriculum reform for the madrasas. 4.2 International Donors and Agencies
EU – planned to engage in the education sector in NWFP with a budget of about €
25 million starting from 2007 (if not earlier), preferably through the SWAp modality
as in the Sind province. However, EU seems to be in a hurry and therefore is prepared
to join into other initiatives even before a sector plan is ready. It was emphasized that
EU’s support will be linked to the Medium Term Expenditure Framework. Of the €25
million budget, about. € 5 million will be used for TA while the rest will be budget
support. Currently EU has engaged an international consultant for 6 months (up to
June 2006) to assist in facilitating the development of the sector plan for NWFP
government.
DFID – is still reviewing the modality for its future engagement in NWFP; but most
likely it will go for a multi-sectoral approach. The team was told that ‘DFID has
learnt that there is a need for a cross-sectoral approach to education’. At the time of
this review, DFID had a team of consultants in the province supposed to look into all
sectors and prepare an ‘Overall Reform Framework’ for the NWFP government. The
plan was to have the consultant report completed by December 2005. The expected
budget was around £ 5-7 million which will probably be used for TA for a period of
4-5 year starting from FY 2006/07. The position of resident Senior Education adviser
for DFID has been vacant for sometime now; perhaps this is an indication of
uncertainty on the part of DFID on the strategy for their future engagement,
particularly the role of education adviser within the multi-sector programme. The
team was, however, informed that the position has been filled now and the new
person is expected to start her/his duties early next year. In addition, the team was
also informed that there has been a kind of decentralisation within DFID under which
the DFID Pakistan office has been assigned more power to take decision on some
policy issues.

The World Bank – has abandoned SAC and is now almost certain that it will go
back to NWFP from FY 2006/07 with a new 3 year programme (to start with) on what
it now calls ‘Human Development Credit’, which basically includes education, but
also health and water. This seems to imply that the World Bank will go for social
sector support in NWFP. This approach will present particular challenges on how to
link up social sector budget support to a well coordinated education sector
programme. As long as the Bank’s Policy Matrix for its Budget Support, in particular
its education objectives and indicators is not in contradiction to or interferes with
other donors’ education sector plans there should be a basis for a constructive
coordination and harmonization between the two approaches, that is, an education
sector approach and the general budget support. The Bank’s focus still remains on
macro economic and budgetary indicators, as well as governance issues.
The Netherlands together with the World Bank, DFID and GTZ were involved in
the Primary Education Project (PEP) in NWFP up to 2001 when the then newly
elected government decided to pull out of Pakistan. Now, the Dutch are coming back
to the education sector in NWFP. From the beginning of 2005 the Dutch have decided
to engage an education adviser to carry out a situational analysis of the education
sector in Pakistan and advise the Dutch government on a new strategy and modality
for support to the education sector. The strategy is expected to be completed by the
end of December this year and be approved by March 2006. Thus by March 2006 the
education strategy, as well as the modality and budget for Dutch engagement in
Pakistan would be ready. Most likely the focus would be in three provinces, namely
Sind, NWFP and Baluchistan. From their previous engagement, the Dutch have learnt
three things:
• Multi-sectoral programmes are difficult and often won’t work • If you want changes in Government structure – go sector wise
Thus, from the lessons above, the Dutch would prefer to give the government the
necessary time to develop a government-owned sector plan. In the meantime, the
Dutch will adapt a flexible approach of ‘Don’t push too much. Let see what we can
achieve now’
by looking at alternative modalities and interventions. It is almost
certain that the Dutch have decided to support the SWAp modality. In this regard, the
Dutch would strongly wish to collaborate and harmonize their intervention with other
donors, especially the so-called ‘Like Minded Donors’.

GTZ is one of the agencies that have had a long and continuous presence in the
education sector in NWFP. Their experience is therefore very valuable and will have
a definitive bearing on the future SWAp. For the purpose of this discussion, its
involvement can be traced way back to the Primary Education Programme (1995-
2002) in the province. The Primary Education Programme (PEP) was actually a big
multi-donor project with an umbrella PC1, in the opinion of GTZ. Although it had a
harmonization unit, PEP was not linked to the normal and regular budget of the
provincial government. Among the prominent donors in the PEP were DfID,
Germany, Netherland and CIDA. During PEP, Germany coordinated the Dutch
support. Donors’ harmonisation unit was closed when the government established its
own monitoring and coordinating body for the programme after few years in the
existence of PEP.
A combination of factors led to the termination of PEP in 2002. Primarily, the 1999 army coup in the country led many donors such as DFID, CIDA, the Netherlands and EU to stop their support to Pakistan. The situation was not helped by the 2001 devolution process which was hastily introduced and created many problems including the high levels of corruption which characterised the devolution process at least during its initial years. GTZ, however, continued its support and presence in the province focusing mainly on curriculum and textbook reform on a project basis. Broadly speaking, GTZ remained the only donor to education in NWFP until other donors’ resumed again in the aftermath of September 11, 2001. With the coming of BEIP in 2003, GTZ and DFID were initially to provide technical assistance for the project. While GTZ’s TA was to mainly focus on the provision of manuals and in-service training of teachers, DFID’s efforts were to be directed towards management training of the Assistant District Officers (ADOs) and head teachers and also in the reactivation and strengthening of the PTAs. However, this was not to happen as planned when in 2004 DFID had to temporarily terminate its engagement while contemplating a new approach to its intervention in education in the province. As articulated above, DFID is now planning for the multi-sector approach for its support in the NWFP. With the non-availability of DFID’s TA for BEIP in 2004, GTZ assumed the management training responsibility that initially was to be done by the DFID. All indicates that GTZ has been very successful in providing the TA stipulated in the BEIP and that its TA has been instrumental in the successful implementation of the BEIP project and therefore, strengthening and improving quality basic education in NWFP. Not only has GTZ conducted a number of training programmes, it has also developed training manuals for master trainers which are currently being used in province. On the management training, GTZ is now focusing on strengthening the financial system which is perceived to be too weak, especially at the district and school level. In fact, at the time of this review 8 DO (Finance) were being trained as master trainers to train the high school and higher secondary schools head masters/mistresses on budgetary and financial matters. More importantly, the 2004 BEIP Review raised the concern regarding BEIP’s model of operation and working. The general impression then was that GTZ works in isolation and that both the local institutions and project management are not adequately involved or sometimes ignored completely in the designing, planning and implementation of GTZ’s TA programmes. Instead of working WITH the people, GTZ was seen as doing the work FOR the people and it was correctly argued that this approach hindered the inherent learning and capacity building of the local institutions that was emphasized in and expected to be a consequence of the BEIP project. This was also reported to have been a source of misunderstanding between the BEIP management unit and GTZ. However, a general observation by this review clearly indicates that this problem has been resolved and that a constructive reciprocal cooperation is now evident between GTZ and BEIP management unit. On the development of SWAp in the province it is important to reiterate GTZ’s commitment to it. The review team was informed that GTZ in 2004 had refused to redefined PC1 so as to push the process of developing SWAp in NWFP. In this regard, GTZ is very much concerned about the weak institutional capacity within the Schools and Literacy Department of the NWFP government. To provide an example, GTZ mentioned the Directorate of Curriculum Development which is said to be totally based on donor-funded projects. Thus, GTZ, like EU, is convinced that TA is indispensable in supporting the development of SWAp in NWFP. GTZ, however, is very optimistic regarding the prospects of SWAp in the province. First, GTZ is pleased with the current leadership in the School and Literacy Department, especially the current Secretary of Education Department, whom GTZ perceived to be good and committed to the education reform in the province. This is true despite the fact that GTZ realised that the Task Force established by the government to oversee the development of SWAp is not producing. Indeed, GTZ has put a local task force to assist the government Task Force. Second, it is enthusiasm that is currently displayed by various donors and multilateral agencies towards education sector reform in NWFP. In particular, the return of the Netherlands, CIDA and EU to the education sector in the province has been a great source of inspiration towards the development of SWAp in the province. The Netherlands have already decided in principle to commit its support to education and through SWAp modality, whilst CIDA has also finalised its agreement for budgetary support through a debt swap mechanism earmarked to teacher education. EU has engaged an international consultant to provide TA for the development of SWAp as articulated above. Actually, the EU’s international consultant is housed at GTZ premises. Indeed, GTZ is not worried much over the new modalities of DFID and the World Bank. As indicated above, DFID is currently planning a multi sector approach and in practice this would mean essentially working closely with the Planning and Finance Department. This implies that DFID would be working to strengthen the Finance Department, which is a very crucial step in the successful implementation of SWAp. On its part, the World Bank’s Human Development Policy comes in the form of budgetary assistance to the province. The Bank’s emphasis on the Medium Term Expenditure Framework in particular would be a valuable added advantage to the SWAp in the province. Thus, GTZ is of the opinion that the prospects for developing a strong and workable SWAp in the province are higher now than ever before. And rather than contradicting and conflicting with the initiatives of DFID and the World Bank, GTZ believes that a well designed SWAp will not only counterbalance, but also positively complement and support the initiatives of DFID and the Bank. 4.3 Local Stakeholders
NCHD – the National Commission for Human Development (NCHD) is a national
statutory established by the President of Pakistan, General Pervez Musharraf in July
2002. It was designed to find innovative solutions to improve and fill implementation
gaps in social service delivery at the grassroots in the sectors of Education, Health and
Poverty Alleviation.
Specifically to education, the NCHG programme aims to assist the government in
achieving 100% primary school enrolment and to open schools in areas where no
government schools exist. It also aims to facilitate economic empowerment and
improve the employment rate. NCHD’s education programme primarily targets three
age groups:
• 5-7 year olds will be beneficiaries of the Universal Primary Education, • 8-14 year olds will benefit from the Basic Literacy and Non Formal • 15-39 year olds will enrol in an Adult Literacy project followed by a Skills In addition to the above, NCHD’s education programme also aims to improve retention rate and also to provide education to the disabled children and people, although the “mentally disabled” were purposely excluded in the 1st phase of the program. Thus, NCHD’s engagement in the education sector have involved a wide range of activities which include, among others, enrolment and empowerment campaigns for the community to take control of education; selection and training of social workers for data collection and supporting the teachers in improving enrolment and retention; supporting district government in the collection of education data and development and maintenance of an authentic system for continuously updating the data in the district; establishing community schools; selection and training of community teachers; provision of salaries to community teachers; provision of school facilities and teaching and learning materials and activation of PTA in schools. It should be emphasised that the 5 – 9 year old age group is the focus of NCHD’s intervention in education so far. Here, the subject matter focus, at least from a rhetoric point of view is placed on the development of three types of skills in children, namely communication skills, observation skills and critical thinking skills. Adult literacy is primarily targeted to mothers; that is, to support the mother to support her children. At the end of 2005, NCHD operated in 70 districts throughout the country. The district selection is said to have been done by the respective provincial government. In 2006, 50 more districts will be included in the NCHD’s coverage and finally in 2007, all 126 districts in Pakistan will be covered by NCHD. With the 2 billion Rupees grant to NCHD from the Government of Pakistan alone, let alone donations and grants from other sources, NCHD feels that it is financially sound to support its activities. There was talk within NCHD that about 4 billion Rupees will be allocated to its education programme over the next 5 years. Most likely, it is this sound financial status, perhaps more than any other things, which is responsible for the great enthusiasm within NCHD on attaining its objectives of improving enrolment and retention and also improve learning in schools as well as empowering communities to take control of education. However, this enthusiasm is not without its challenges. Challenges for NCHD
First and foremost, it is obvious that NCHD suffers from a legitimacy problem. From
the opinions gathered during the fieldwork, most people thought that NCHD is a
parallel structure and therefore, duplication rather than a complementary body to the
government, both at the federal and district levels. This easily creates contradictions
and confusion especially at district and community level. This sentiment is further
strengthened by the perception that has developed among the population that NCHD
is being supported and therefore enjoys material, financial as well as political support
from the highest office in the country – the President. There is a general feeling that
the material and financial support now directed to NCHD should have been
channelled to the respective Federal Ministries and district governments directly.
The above sentiment is not helped by either NCHD’s mode of operation or its media
strategy. Instead of working out agreements with the Provincial government and
operating through the district governments, NCHD does not go through the provincial
government; but directly to the districts. There was no signed agreement or written
MoU document between provincial government and NCHD. At the district level,
NCHD has set up a full fledged office instead of working with and through the
government. Furthermore, it has a media strategy claiming all successes in enrolment
and retention in the province to be the product of NCHD’s interventions exclusively.
This seems to ‘add insult to injury’. Undoubtedly, it is the combination of these two
factors, together with the perception described above, that are behind the increased
resentment towards NCHD’s initiatives especially at the district level. Although it has
not yet happened in NWFP, it is worth mentioning here that in Rahim-Yar-Khan
district in Punjab province for example, NCHD’s data was not accepted by the
District officials.
DTCE – The Devolution Trust for Community Empowerment (DTCE) is a non-
governmental organization created by the Government of Pakistan though the
National Reconstruction Bureau (NRB) to proactively promote the community
participation elements of the Local Government Ordinance 2001. DTCE is supported
by several donors, including Norway, that are mainly channelling their funds through
UNDP. In its support to DTCE, the UNDP strategy is to provide an integrated support
to the design and implementation of devolution by developing synergies with and
exploiting complementarities at the local government level. It also attempts to forge
partnership at different levels of government, donors, CSOs and NGOs, towards the
same ends. Thus, supporting effective community participation in local governance
and promotion and assistance to voluntary associations of local nazims and
councillors at district, thesil, and union levels are the two main focuses of DTCE’s
initiatives. Broadly speaking, this is being accomplished through creating an enabling
environment in the form of encouraging local community to establish “Citizen
Community Boards (CCBs)”. According to the law (Local Governance Ordinance
2001) 25% of the provincial development funds are to be disbursed through the
CCBs. DTCE, therefore, is principally engaged with social mobilization campaigns to
encourage the formation of CCBs at all local government levels and capacity building
of the local government officials as well as elected local politicians. This is often
followed by some tailor made orientation and training programmes to the CCBs on
how to manage their development projects and also on their rights, especially on how
CCBs can apply for development funds.
DTCE is currently involved in 13 districts in Pakistan: 5 in Punjab, 5 in NWFP, 2 in Sind and 1 in Baluchistan. Based on the information collected from DTCE head office at Islamabad, so far, 25 000 CCBs have been formed in Pakistan. Upon establishment of CCB at the Union Council level, a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) is signed between DTCE and the respective Union Council, which then receives 40 000 Rupees for CCB registration, orientations and training programmes and communication. It should also be noted that Union Councils themselves develop sector priority lists for their respective council and community CCBs come out with their own projects according to these sector priority lists. The review team was informed that education features predominantly in the sector priority lists of various union councils. A number of CCBs have been established in areas such as construction of additional classrooms, school boundary walls, latrines etc., although it was also noted that a lot more could have been achieved in this realm if communities had been encouraged and assisted to make use of the CCBs mechanism. According to DTCE there is a huge under-utilization of the funds allocated for CCBs in Pakistan. It was mentioned that about 60 million Rupee targeted to CCBs have remain unspent because CCBs had not been established. DTCE is therefore planning to expand its activities to reach all 126 districts in Pakistan, which together have 350 thesil and 6220 union council by 2009. 4.4 Earthquake Impact
NWFP is one of the provinces that experienced the devastating impact of the October
8, 2005 earthquake in the country. Undoubtedly, this is the worst natural calamity in
Pakistan’s history. The colossal loss of life and property caused by the earthquake
makes the relief, reconstruction and rehabilitation efforts a mammoth task. Not only
will it take a lot of resources, both human and financial, but also rebuilding the
earthquake hit areas would demand a long period of time of sustained and coordinated
efforts from local, national and international relief agencies and development
partners.
Although international support was late to come, finally, on Saturday 19 November,
at the International Donor Conference, the world conscience was shaken and stirred
when a total of $ 5.9 billion was pledged for the reconstruction and rehabilitation of
the earthquake areas1. To this amount, President Pervez Musharraf of Pakistan has put
the onus on the Pakistanis to come up with at least $ 1 billion more to match the spirit
of foreign donors.
1 The pledges were as follows: Asian Development Bank ($ 1 billion); World Bank ($1 billion); Saudi Arabia ($ 573 million); United States ($ 510 million); Islamic Development Bank ( $ 501 million); China ($ 326 million); IMF ($ 375 million); Iran ($ 200 million); Turkey ($150 million); Germany ($ 100 million); France ($ 124 million); Britain ($120 million); European Commission ($110); Japan ($120 million), United Arab Emirates ($ 100 million); The Netherlands ($ 70 million); Norway ($ 70 million); Canada ($ 66 million) and Aga Khan Development Network ($ 50 million). 5 districts in NWFP (out of the 24 in the province) have been affected by the
earthquake. These are: Abbottabad, Mansehra (mostly affected especially Balakote),
Battagram, Kohistan and Shangla.
One of these districts Abbottabad was visited by
the review team as indicated earlier. It is impressive to report the rapidity with which
the districts, provincial and federal government have assessed the impact of this
natural disaster.
At the time of the review visit, both the provincial and district governments have
already developed a damage list and therefore, acquired a clearer picture of the impact
of earthquake to the children, teachers and schools in general. According to the
statistics at the provincial level, it is estimated that 2143 children and 81 teachers
died, not to mention thousands of children and teachers who have been traumatized
by the earthquake in the province. On the physical structures, about 2159 schools
have been completely destroyed in NWFP. A district-wise distribution of the total
number of children and teachers who died and schools totally destroyed in the
earthquake is presented in the table below.
Table 1: Total number of children, teachers and schools affected in the
earthquake

Abbotta-
Kohistan
Manshera Batta-
Shangla Total
No. of pupils/ 19
students died
No. of

Teachers
died
No. of totally

destroyed
schools

At Abbottabad district, the review team was presented with a comprehensive list of all schools (boys and girls) that have been affected by the October 8 earthquake and the aftershocks. The team visited two schools, namely Govt. Comprehensive Higher Secondary School (Girls) and Govt. High School No. 4 Abbottabad (Boys), which were destroyed by the earthquake. In both schools (with more that 600 students each) classes have resumed but teaching had to be conducted outside on the school’s compound. In addition to the two schools, the team also visited the Tentage Village for Earthquake Affectees called ‘Banda Said Khan Havelian’. The village has a population of about 6000 families, a population which is said to be steadily increasing day by day, according to Mr. Tariq Bak, a Secretary of Lok Sudhaar Association in the village. The affectees in the village came from as far as Balakote, Battagram, Allahi, Muzzaffabad and Bakote. At the Banda Said Khan Havelian village, the team found two ‘tent’ schools, namely Lok Sudhaar Primary School (a private school-UNICEF Supported) and Govt. Middle School have been established for affected children. The Lok Sudhaar Primary school is a private school run by the local organization – Lok Sudhaar Association. At the time of our visit the school had the enrolment of 290 children (from Kachi class/Nursery to grade 4 as shown in the table below) which is accommodated in three tents. Table 2: Grade-wise distribution of pupils according to gender in Lok Sudhaar
Primary School


According to the Head teacher, Mr Tariq Bak, Lok Primary school has 8 teachers: 7
(male) and 1 (female). There should be two female teachers, but one female teacher
has failed to perform her duties due to the traumas from the earthquake. Teachers in
this school are being paid by the Lok Sudhaar Association. The school has received
assistance in the form of teaching materials and textbooks from UNICEF,
acknowledged Mr Tariq Bak, who also emphasized that provision of additional tents
is the number one priority. There is still a huge demand for tents in order to curb
down the overcrowded classrooms. Given the size of their current tents, the school
needs a minimum of 5 additional tents in order to accommodate the current number of
children in school.
The Govt. Middle School has a total enrolment of 496 pupils, from Kachi/Nursery to
8th Grade level (see table 3 below). The school has 10 teachers - all men. The teachers
in this school are paid by Government. The school has only 3 tents. According to Mr
Naseer Hussain, the Head Master, the school needs a minimum of 10 tents in order to
accommodate the total number of pupils. Currently one class is conducted outside in
an open area, while 2-3 classes/grades are accommodated in one tent each. It is
striking to learn that this school, which is situated adjacent to UNICEF supported Lok
Sudhaar Primary School has not received any assistance from neither national
organizations nor international agencies. There is an urgent need for not only
additional tents and teachers, but also teaching materials, textbooks and other school
facilities especially due to the rapidly increasing number of pupils in schools, stressed
Mr Naseer Hussain.

Table 3: Grade-wise distribution of pupils according to gender in Govt. Middle
School, Tentage Village, B. S. Khan, Abbottabad

Perhaps the most interesting and indeed, encouraging development in these schools is that children who have never been to schools before, are enrolling. The head teachers of the two schools at Banda Said Khan Havelian Village have acknowledge the enrolment of a number of school aged children, especially those from the rural and remote areas, who have never been in school before. This fact was also mentioned during our interview with Kees van den Bosch– the education adviser of the Dutch Embassy who was a member of the ‘UN-Emergency Education’ cluster in the relief and rehabilitation period. Among other things, he observed that the challenge is to also include children who have not been in school before into the new schools. In this way, the current disaster, despite of its adverse negative consequence may in its own way provide an opportunity for increased enrolment. However, without seeking to undervalue this encouraging trend, it is important, at this point, to emphasize that there are still many school-aged children who do not yet have access to school. The very fact that there are only 786 children enrolled in schools in a village of 6000 families speaks volumes about the demand for school in the earthquake affected villages. There is a clear demand for more schools to accommodate children who are not yet back to school. 5. Challenges and Recommendations
5.1 SWAp

It is evident from the review that the process of developing SWAp in NWFP has
gained new momentum, especially under the EU initiative. As noted earlier, EU has
engaged a consultant to assist the Government of NWFP in the development of
SWAp in the province. More significantly, other development partners are not only
coming back in the province, but also have proclaimed interest in coordinating their
interventions and channelling their support to education through the SWAp modality.
In particular, the return of the Netherlands and Canada, the so-called Like Minded
Donors group, into the education sector in NWFP is of particular significance to the
Norwegian BEIP project. This has certainly increased the platform for coordination
and harmonisation, at least among the three Like Minded Donors. In addition, the
enthusiasm currently portrayed by EU and GTZ is a great source of inspiration
towards the development of SWAp in the province. Thus, the prospects to plan and
implement a successful SWAp in NWFP are currently better than ever before. Given
the nature of the BEIP project, the Embassy needs to keenly follow up the progress of
the EU initiative towards the development of SWAp in the province. In this follow up
the Embassy would need to closely liaison with other donors, in particular the Like
Minded Donors, especially in the planning stage of the SWAp. Professional assistance
would be useful to the Embassy at that stage, not least in assessing alternatives with
the aim to link up to suitable mechanism appropriate for Norway’s development
strategy.
Recommendation
• The review team strongly recommends that the Embassy closely follow up the EU • In the follow up process, the Embassy should liaison with other donors to education in NWFP, especially with the Like Minded Donors in order to enlarge and strengthen the platform for coordination and harmonisation. • Finally, it is strongly recommend that at the planning stage of SWAp the Embassy seek professional assistance to identify suitable mechanisms to link up to the SWAp in accordance with Norwegian development strategy. 5.2 Gender

BEIP’s focus on gender is generally weak. In the visits to and discussions with the
education department at both the district and provincial level women were not
present. The team had to specifically request for the women presentation, and even
then in only two districts, namely Mardan and Abbottabad could the team meet with
female education staff. In the other three districts – Kohat, Hangu and Swabi the team
did not meet with female staff even after asking for it.
On the background of the very weak female representation throughout the field visits,
the team decided to hold a separate meeting with female staff at the education
department in the Abbottabad district to examine more closely the issue of girls’
education and working conditions for female staff at the district level.
The low enrolment of girls into schools, especially in the rural and remote areas, was
the first issue to be raised and acknowledged by the female staff. This was said to be
caused by multiple factors such as poverty, parents’ illiteracy, and traditional
practices in particular early marriages, long distance to schools as well as lack of
female teachers in schools. In all districts visited there is a considerable shortage of
female teachers especially in the rural areas. Although it is generally difficult to
recruit teachers in the rural and remote areas, it was said that this is more so when it
comes to female teachers due to lack of teachers houses and facilities, security and
long distance from their own communities. The same concerns were also raised by the
female ADOs regarding their follow-up of schools in rural areas in their respective
circles. According to the devolution process, circle ADOs are supposed to move from
the district education department office to the Local Circle Offices (LCOs). Based on
the information collected from the female ADOs met, serious concerns were raised
about the practicability of this policy. In short, the female staff did not have the
opportunity to move to their respective LCOs. It was particularly mentioned that it
will be very difficult or practically impossible for many of them to convince their
families to move from town to go and live in rural areas. Thus, as a solution to this
problem it was proposed that recruitment of female circle ADOs should, as far as
possible, be among individuals from the respective community.

Gender is one of the main focus areas of the Norwegian development assistance.
According to the BEIP’s project agreement, one of the main obligations and
conditions for support stipulates gender focus as follow: ‘Female participation in the
programme activities shall be secured through means and targets presented to
Norway and approved in the first Annual meeting.’
A careful review of the project
report shows inadequate reflection on the gender dimension. This is so even though
36 million Rupees has been allocated by the NWFP government for gender supported
programmes in the province. Both our field visits as well as documentary
analysis/review suggest that there is urgent need for actions to be taken, not only to
mainstream gender into all project activities, but also to make it more explicit in the
project reports.

Recommendation

• As a matter of immediate action, the review team strongly recommends that the Embassy recruit a local female consultant to help mainstreaming gender into the project. • As suggested by the female staff, the review team recommends that Embassy use its good rapport with the provincial government to encourage it to, as far as possible, recruit circle ADOs, especially female ADOs, based on the community the candidate comes from. The project’s Annual Meeting in August 2006 would be an appropriate forum for the discussion of these issues between the Embassy and the provincial government. 5.3 Operationalisation of LCOs
The construction of the 300 LCOs which accounts for about 35% of the BEIP project
has been observed to be proceeding well. Indeed, 100 LCOs are reported to have been
completed or are in the near completion stage. However, none of the completed LCOs
have been put in use yet. The review team was not shown any functional LCO, even
after it specifically asked for it. The project PIU informed the team that the
procurement process of the furniture and other facilities and equipment was delayed
due to government bureaucracy. But, at the time of this review all formalities had
been completed and the procurement process had started. Although there is an urgent
need of putting the finished LCOs to use immediately, the project has no action plan
that shows how this is going to happen. The project therefore needs to develop an
action plan that will guide its activities in making the LCOs functional. The action
plan will, consequently, also be used for monitoring and evaluation of the BEIP’s
activities in this respect.
Recommendation
• The review team is aware that there is no approved PC-1 for operationalization of the LCOs. This represent a limitation as to how the BEIP project management can follow up on this issue. However, this issue should be discussed at the Annual Meeting. The local administration at the school circle level should be encouraged to utilize the LCOs and LTRCs, and the schools should likewise be encouraged to use the LTRCs. It may well be that the issue of optimization of the use of these resources locally should be announced as a consulting assignment. 5.4 School Monitoring System
In the meetings with district personnel, especially from the ADOs, a concern was
raised about the shortcomings of the follow up and monitoring system of the schools
by the districts. In particular, a concern was raised over the pedagogical and
administrative follow up of the schools by the districts. The team was informed that
each ADO is at the moment responsible for on the average about 100 schools. This is
obviously too many schools to be handled by one person. As it was admitted by the
ADOs themselves that it is practically impossible to adequately follow-up and
monitor 100 schools pedagogically and administratively. It was particularly
mentioned that it is difficult to attend to and support teachers’ pedagogical challenges.
This situation is further compounded by the transport problems that are faced by the
ADOs, especially the female ADOs as mentioned earlier. As a result of these
constraints the schools’ monitoring process has been in general very superficial and
mainly concentrated in the urban schools or schools closely to the ADOs. Closely
related to this is the concern over the lack of motivation by the teachers. Again and
again, lack of motivation by the teachers has been mentioned as one of the main
problems facing basic education in NWFP in particular and Pakistan in general. This
is, perhaps, not surprising given to the ground realities of the working conditions in
the schools, which are extremely poor and obviously de-motivating for the teachers.
In short, with the contemporary working conditions in schools it is extremely difficult
to have a good school and thus motivated teachers. To be sure, this is not limited to
Pakistan alone. Lack of motivation by the teachers is a widespread problem in most
developing countries.

In addressing this challenge one needs to first assess teachers’ actual working
condition and find out the reasons or factors that are responsible for their
demotivation.
Recommendation
• The Embassy should raise and follow up the monitoring issue with the provincial government. In particular, the Embassy should encourage the provincial government to rethink and revitalise the district monitoring system of schools by devising appropriate incentive packages to the circle ADOs, especially the female ADOs so that they an accomplish this task. • The Embassy should also encourage the provincial and district governments to select and recruit female ADOs from their respective local community as mentioned in above (see 5:1) • The Embassy should encourage and support the provincial government in conducting a study to identify factors that demoralise the teachers, in order to design an appropriate and effective incentive package. 5.5 Assessment of the training programmes
As indicated above, training programmes are among the success story of BEIP project
in NWFP. The training programmes have been held according to the plan and the
beneficiaries, both individual and institutions are appreciative of the programmes and
have also acknowledged satisfaction on the usefulness and relevance of the training
programmes on their respective work. However, there is now a need and a request
from the provincial government to conduct an assessment of the outcome of the
training programmes offered by the BEIP. A request to assess outcome and impact
aspects of the training is also included in the minutes of the last Steering Committee
Meeting of the project. The review team concurs with the provincial government; the
request for outcome assessment pf BEIP’s training programme is both appropriate and
important at this stage of the project and the Embassy should follow it up.

Recommendation

• The Embassy should follow up and support an assessment of the outcome of the BEIP’s training programme, which has also been requested by the provincial government 5.6 Stakeholders’ Coordination
Lack of proper communication and well-coordinated efforts at the community level
needs to be addressed. At the moment, initiatives of different stakeholders – NCHD,
DTCE, NGOs and other organisations both secular and religious, as well as the
international donors seem to be operating in isolation and independent of each other.
In the discussion with NCHD and DTCE for example, it was evident to the team that
there is neither communication about nor attempts at coordinating their respective
interventions, irrespective of the fact that the potential synergy of such coordination is
obvious for the two stakeholders. There is, therefore, the need to devise an
overarching coordination mechanism at the community level to harmonise and realign
government’s efforts and the initiatives of all other stakeholders (both local and
international) in education. At this point, it is worth remembering that private schools
and schools run by NGOs and other organisations in Pakistan accounts for ca. 40% of
all children enrolled in basic education in the country. Here, the Paris Declaration on
harmonisation, coordination and alignment would be a useful tool. Given the statutory
nature of both NCHD and DTCE, the involvement of the federal government in the
process of devising a binding coordination mechanism is critical.
Recommendation
• In accordance to the Paris Declaration, the Embassy should use its good rapport with both the federal and provincial government to follow up and encourage the development of coordination mechanisms of all stakeholders in education in Pakistan. If necessary and requested, the Embassy may consider facilitating and supporting that process. 5.7 Lack of Communication within the District Government
It is evident that the devolution process in Pakistan has come a long way. Various
structures of government, especially at the district level, have been put in place and
systems of operations are gradually emerging. In general, the devolution process in
Pakistan is on the right track. However, at the district level there are still some
concerns over the lack of conducive communication between DCOs and DEOs and
sometimes between DEO and EDOs. This concern also featured in the 2004 project
review.
Recommendation
• While the magnitude of the problem has decreased compared to last year, this review wants to raise this concern again, especially given that the lack of communication impedes the progress already achieved in the devolution process. The Embassy should utilize appropriate opportunities to discuss this issue with the responsible management levels in the provincial education sector. 5.8 Political interference
The concern was also raised about the political interference into the affairs of the
Schools and Literacy Department. Repeatedly, complaints were made about
politically motivated transfers, as well as recruitment into senior position within the
Department. Instead of merit, favouritism based on political affiliation and patronage
was said to be the norm in getting promotion or being transferred into the most
favourable and lucrative positions and places. Oftentimes the review team was
informed that teacher transfers in the province are highly politically motivated.
Sometimes, teachers are transferred without consulting with EDOs. Moreover, there
were some enunciations that the last changes in the leadership of the management unit
of BEIP were also politically motivated. Furthermore, the review team met with at
least one DEO who claimed to have been transferred more than four times in a year as
punishment, not only for criticising provincial government for lack of political
commitment in improving education, but also because it was known that he does not
agree with the ideology of the ruling party.
Recommendation
• While this is a difficult and sensitive area for intervention, it is nevertheless important for the Embassy to be aware of this concern and whenever possible and appropriate raise the issue with the concerned authorities 5.9 Weak Institutional Capacity
There is general concern among development partners over the weak institutional
capacity within the School and Literacy Department of the NWFP Government,
especially in the financial and budgetary affairs. This concern is more alarming given
the upcoming SWAp and general budget support modality in the province. The weak
institutional capacity is not only limited to financial and budgetary affairs, but also to
other areas.
Recommendation
• As highlighted earlier, the Directorate of Curriculum Development is totally based on donor funded projects. The Embassy should take into consideration in its advice to the provincial government the strong need for continued Technical Assistance (TA) in the upcoming SWAp in the province. DRAFT Terms of Reference
Review of the Basic Education Improvement Project (BEIP) in North
Western Frontier Province (NWFP), Autumn 2005.
1. Background

In December 2003, the Norwegian Government signed an Agreement with the Government of Pakistan to support the Basic Education Improvement Project (BEIP) with a grant amounting to NOK 72,6 million. There is no commitment on additional funding above the NOK 72,6 mill. from Norway. The BEIP was then defind as a “gap filling project” to the Institutional Reforms Programme” (IRP) funded by the World Bank. The IRP targeted the full social sector, though around 60% of the funds have been used for the education sector. During the preparation period for the BEIP support, the objective of expanding/having the flexibility to integrate the support into a (primary) education (sub-)sector programme was clearly expressed in the Embassy's Work Plan for 2004 and 2005. The signed Agreement for BEIP therefore has the flexibility to facilitate such a change. After commissioning a joint assessment (with DFID) in September 2003, of possibilities for establishing a Sector Wide Approach Programme (SWAp) in the education sector and support to the same, there have been approaches by individual donors to spearhead such a programme; particularly by DFID. However, these attempts have, for different reasons, not materialised or failed. Today, the European Commission (EC) has deployed an international consultant in the Schools & Literacy Department in NWFP. The objective is to assess both the possibilities to establish a SWAp for NWFP and FATA, and the modalities for the same. The EC has established an overall timeframe for their plans and work towards a SWAp, leading to a signed agreement during end of 2006. Other donors will be welcomed to join into this programme. In September 2005, the Govt. of NWFP constituted a 5 member committee to work towards the same objective; establishing an education SWAp in the NWFP. Other donors; like the World Bank and the USAID may also be interrested to be in the forefront of such a development, as well as other donors that may want to join in. Norway should therefore assess the status of existing alternatives with the aim to link up to a suitable mechanism appropriate for Norway’s development strategy if and when these are developed. Meanwhile, implementation of the bilateral agreement on support to BEIP shall be in focus for the Embassy’s follow up and monitoring of the project. It has therefore been decided to undertake a review which shall focus upon issues relevant for the general implementation of the project, but with some inputs towards assessing the status of the SWAp initiatives. This process is now linked to a formally constituted Task Force Group through the GoNWFP. The Government of NWFP has established a certain unit for the Institutional Reforms
Programme (IRP) of the Education Sector in the province. Ideally, the Schools &
Literacy Department (SLD) through their internal planning unit should be responsible
also for BEIP, since BEIP is a gap-filling project for the IRP. However, for BEIP, a
Project Implementation Unit (PIU) was established. This situation may have created
some initial confusion regarding roles and responsibilities regarding implementation
of the project, but is believed to have no significance at the present stage. The factual
role of the IRP v.s BEIP may be discussed by the consultants, but is not regarded as a
prioritised task.
The implementation of the devolution process in Pakistan is important for any project
of BEIP’s nature as this will have some impact particularly on the local level
implementation and decision-making processes. This was particularly focussed during
last years review of BEIP through a consultant specially assigned for this purpose.
Recent development in this process having significant effect on the implementation
should also be assessed through this review, but not as a major issue.
The devastating earthquake on October 8th will have major impact on the education in
the province during years ahead. Together with an unknown number of teachers,
thousands of schoolchildren are dead; thousands of schools are destroyed or damaged;
-as are an unknown number of buildings used for other education purposes and for
administration of the education system. Together with all other damaged
infrastructure, it will take years to rebuild schools and reach the modest level from
before the earthquake. The BEIP programme does however mainly cater for
“overhead structures”; including capacity building of administrators and trainers. It is
therefore believed that the priorities of the GoNWFP are to continue this work; i.e.
carry on the implementation of the BEIP programme. The project component of
constructing 300 Teachers Resource Centers may however have to be revised; some
finished buildings may have suffered substantial damage and priorities may now be
different. Though such issues will have to be addressed through the formal decision
making processes between the Embassy and GoP and GoNWFP, the review team
should bring up the issue of possible priorities (if any) for change in work plan and
budget for F.Y. 2005/2006, and indicate such priorities in the report.
2. Purpose of the Review

The purpose of the Review Mission is to assess various aspects related to the implementation of the Basic Education Improvement Project in NWFP and particularly over the last year, in order to provide advice and recommendations for the future life of the project. As such, the Review Mission shall assess relevant aspects of capacity within the NWFP education department relevant for planning, implementation and monitoring of a project of this kind. Special attention shall be given to assessing the capacity on lower levels; i.e. district, thesil and union counsils. The linkages that the project has to other projects shall be addressed. This shall be mainly for identifying possibilities for (further) cooperation and drawing upon capacity built within other units of the department or other projects, as well as to avoid overlap & duplication. Clarification of responsibilities and division of tasks between institutions or projects is concidered to be important in order to achieve efficient implementation, and the mission shall also address such possibilities. The new initiatives towards establishment of a sectorwide programme in education needs to be adressed in terms of progress status. Given the nature of these initiatives, a further Norwegian follow up shall take recommendations by the consultants into account. A brief follow up of last years findings on the devolution process and it’s consequences for implementation of BEIP, i.e. if there are significant developments on the issues shall also be outlined. The consequenses of the earthquake re. the BEIP project, is not expected to be covered by the review team. However; any clear prioritites and reasons for change in implementation strategy and WorkPlan/budget that are expressed to the consultants shall be included in the report. 3. Scope of Work The review is expected, but not limited, to cover the following: • Assess the overall institutional capacity of the Schools and Literacy Department in Peshawar, NWFP, especially regarding any change being relevant for implementation of a programme of BEIP’s character. Likewise, the role, responsibilities and performance of the established PIU shall be addressed regarding relevance and ability to follow up their defined tasks as the implementing body of the project. The PIU has had several staff changes during the last year, including the project manager, which may have affected the performance of the PIU. Focus of the assessment shall be on the capacity of the department both on the provincial and lower levels in the following general areas: o Relevant aspects of technical capacity and financial management & cash flow being important for the implementation process of BEIP. o The EMIS system, particularly information relevant for teacher administration. o For the PIU, assess the capacity in terms staff size and competency and ability to perform its task (access to policy makers/relevant govt. officials, office facilities, mobility in terms of field visits, etc.). Also assess the division of labour and responsibilities between the PIU and lower levels, i.e. district, tehsil and union council level. o The consultants shall also address the services provided by the SLD and IRP and the cooperation between the PIU and SLD and IRP • Assess how the BEIP may benefit through (further) cooperation with other projects or sections/units within the education department in the province. New activities, both under the full implementation and funding by the GoNWFP as well as those funded by donors shall be included. Identifying possible overlap or duplication is important. • Address areas of weakness/limited capacity where interventions, e.g. reorganisation or other efforts in e.g. form of Technical Assistance that might strengthen the programme. • Assess the present plans and strategies within the Schools & Literacy Department in Peshawar for future development of the education sector in NWFP especially with relevance to linkages or integration of BEIP into an education SWAp. The Task Force Group established for the purpose September 2005 is particularly relevant, and the status of the group’s work shall be addressed. • Address the status of the EU initiative towards establishing an education SWAp through deploying a consultant in the Education Departments of NWFP and FATA, and tentatively discuss a possible linkage by BEIP (and other donors!) to this programme. • Address the issue of corruption and corrupt practices as and when found relevant. • Moreover, along with analyzing the project organisation with the objective of identifying areas for strengthening and where capacity building is needed, the Mission shall also include an assessment of areas of strength which will positively contribute towards not only the implementation of the project, but also have the potential of further strengthening of the education sector in NWFP. 5. Methodology The Review will be undertaken by two international consultants and assisted by
education advisor from Norad, Oslo. They will be facilitated by the Embassy and the
BEIP PIU. The Review will be based on an analysis of various relevant documents
and consultation with key stakeholders, hereunder the Schools & Literacy Department
in NWFP including its underlying tiers, the PIU and other donors involved in the
(primary) education sector in the province. Also institutions at the federal level,
particularly the Education Ministry and the National Commission for Human
Development (NCHD) should be met, as well as relevant donors. The consultants will
be required to undertake field visits and obtain information through interviews and
discussions, -in particular with different tiers of the education department in NWFP,
and with institutions engaged in implementation of specific project components, as
well as through physical verifications of activities implemented and relevant
correspondence, if required.
Discussions and interviews will pertain to all stakeholders, i.e. persons/institutions
involved in supporting, implementing and benefiting from the programme. Priority
should be given to the staff at the education department as well as at the district
government offices and relevant education institutions including teaching staff.

6. Time Frame
Expected period of commencement is medio November 2005, with the entire exercise completed within a 7 weeks period from the date of initiation. The review period should in total take 3 weeks, including 02 days of desk studies/preparation, 2-weeks mission to the field, and 03 days of report writing. 7. Reporting An outline of the report and main findings and recommendations shall be presented to the Embassy before departure of the team members. Prior to finalisation, a Draft report shall be submitted to the Embassy, followed by a 2 weeks period for comments from the Embassy and respective stakeholders. Thereafter the Final Report shall be completed within 2 weeks. The report is to be concise (not exceeding 15 pages), to be structured in accordance with the ToR and to include an Executive Summary and Recommendations to the Education Department in NWFP, the Norwegian Embassy and other potential donors/partners. Itinerary for the Review of BEIP in NWFP, Pakistan

Monday, Nov. 14.:
12:00-13:30 Meeting with Minister Councellor, Alf Arne Ramslien and First Secretary Hårek Aspenes in the Royal Norwegian Embassy, Islamabad. 14:00-15:30 Meeting with First Secretary Hårek Aspenes and Advisor Aziz Usman, in the Royal Norwegian Embassy, Islamabad. Tuesday, Nov. 15.: 09:00 – 11:30 Meeting with Development Advisor, Siddique Bhatti, European Union, Islamabad. 11:45–12:30 Meeting with National Project Director, Zafar Hayat Malik, Devolution Trust for Community Empowerment (DTCE), Islamabad. Wednesday, Nov. 16.: 09:00 – 10:00 Meeting with Senior Programme Officer, Nargis Sultana, DFID, Islamabad. 12:00 – 14:00 Meeting with Director Education, Azhar Khan, National Commission for Human Development (NCHD), Islamabad. 17:00-17:30 Meeting with Senior Education Adviser, Mr Amir Haqvi, World Bank, Islamabad. Thursday, Nov. 17.: 08:00 – 10:00 Meeting with Fist Secretary Kees van der Bosch, Royal Netherlands Embassy, at the Royal Norwegian Embassy, Islamabad. 11:00 – 13:30 Traveling to Peshawar 14:00 – 16:30 Meeting with the Assistant BEIP Project Manager, Shahid Ali Khan, BEIP Project PIU Office, Peshawar Friday, Nov. 18.: 08:00 – 08:45 Traveling to Kohat District 09:00 – 10:00 Meeting with District Officer, Imtiaz ul Haq and Personal Assistant to EDO (edu.), Mohammed Shokat, Kohat District Education Department, Kohat. 10:00 - 10:30 Visit to Govt. Primary School, P.A:F Bazar, Kohat 10:30 – 11:30 Visit to Local Circle Office/Teacher Resource Centre, Jerma (Female) and Girls Govt. Primary School, Baqizai no. 3, Kohat. 11:30 – 12:30 Visit to St Joseph Cathedral High School, Kohat 12:30 – 13:30 Traveling to Hangu District 13:30 – 14:30 Visit to Local Circle Office/Teacher Resource Centre, Hangu (Male) and Govt. Primary school no. 1, Hangu. 14:30 – 16:00 Meeting with EDO (edu), Arman Shah and ADOs, Hangu District Education Department, Hangu. 16:00 – 18:00 Traveling back to Peshawar. Saturday, Nov. 19.: 08:00 – 09:00 Traveling to Mardan District 09:00 – 10:30 Meeting with EDO(S&L), Wali-Muhammad; DO (S&L-Male), Abdul Haq; DO (S&L-Female), Adalat Begum; ADO (S&L), Mohammad Zarin; ADO (Literacy), Abdul Salam; ADO (Circle Shahbaz Gari-Male), Mardan District Education Department, Mardan. 10:30 – 11:30 Visit to Local Circle Office/Teacher Resource Centre, Rustam (Female) and Govt. Girls Primary School, Muslim Abad, Mardan. 11:30-12:30 Visit to Local Circle Office/Teacher Resource Centre, Rustam (Male) and Govt. Primary School, Hera Wand, Mardan. 12:30 -13:30 Traveling to Swabi District 13:30 – 14:00 Visit to Local Circle Office/Teacher Resource Centre, Kula Khan (Male) and Govt. Primary school Kula Khan no. 1, Swabi. 14:00 – 14:30 Visit to Local Circle Office/Teacher Resource Centre, Kula Khan (Male) and Govt. Primary school Kula Khan no. 1, Swabi. 14:30 – 16:00 Meeting with DO (S&L), Ahmad Humain; ADO (Literacy), Anwar Zaib; ADO (Budget & Account) Muhammad Tariq; EDO (S&L), Rooh-ul-Amin; Headmaster Govt. Middle School-Shara Ghand, Fazli Mahmood, District Education Department, Swabi. 16:00 – 18:00 Traveling back to Peshawar. Monday, 21 Nov.: 10:00 – 13:00 Attending BEIP Annual Meeting together with Minister Councellor, Alf Arne Ramslien and Advisor Aziz Usman, Planning and Development Department, NWFP Government, Peshawar. 13:00 – 14:00 Meeting with BEIP’s Project Manager, Jamandus Khan and Assistant Project Manager, Shahid Khan, Planning and Development Department, NWFP Government, Peshawar. 15:00 – 17:30 Meeting with Principal Advisor, German Technical Cooperation (GTZ), dr. Reinhard Sauer, GTZ Office, Peshawar. 09:00 – 10:00 Meeting with BEIP Staff, Assistant Project Manager, Shahid Khan; Accounts Officer, Niser Ahmad; Accountant and Computer
Assistant, PIU Office, Peshawar.
10:00-12:00 Visiting Institute of Education & Research (IER), University of
Peshawar and Meeting with IER Director, Prof. Dr. Wazim Khan, Peshawar.
12:00-14:00 Meeting with Director, School and Literacy Department, Fazle
Mannan, School & Literacy Department, NWFP Government, Peshawar.
14:30-17:30 Traveling back to Islamabad.
Wednesday, 23. Nov.: 07:30-10:30 Traveling to Abbottabad District
10:30-12:00 Meeting with Deputy District Officer (Male), Zaffar Parvez; ADO
(Literacy), Shan Hussain and Circle ADOs (Female and Male), Executive District
Officer (S&L) Office, Abbottabad.
12:00-13:00 Meeting with Female ADOs alone - Yasmin Aziz (ADO circle
Haralain-45 schools); Shahnaz Umer (ADO circle Hajia Gali – 52 schools); Naheed
Fazal (ADO Circle Bhanitour); Nargis Asif (ADO Circle Abbottabad – 64 schools);
Magbood Jan (ADO Circle LORH – 30 schools); Rizwana Arshad (ADO Circle
Birote – 50 schools); Shahida Khatoon (ADO Circle Boi – 50 schools) and Meher
Sair (ADO Circle Nathia Gal – 67 Schools), Executive District Officer (S&L) Office,
Abbottabad.
13:00 – 14:30 Meeting with District Officer (DO, S&L), DO’s Office, Abbottabad.
14:30 – 15:00 Visiting Govt. Comprehensive Higher Secondary School (Girls) –
completely destroyed by the Earthquarkes, Abbottabad.
15:00 – 15:30 Visiting Govt. High School No. 4 Abbottabad (Boys) – Completely
destroyed by the earthquarke, Abbottabad.
15:30 – 16:30 Visiting a private school – Lok Sudhaar Primary School (UNICEF
Supported) and Govt. Middle School, at TENTAGE VILLAGE FOR
EARTHQUAKE AFFECTEES ‘Banda Said Khan Havelian’.
16:30 – 18:15 Traveling back to Islamabad.


Source: http://www.lins.no/db/pdf/review200601.pdf

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